No confidence vote (Macron)

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743 roadmaster

Home Forums Political Corner No confidence vote (Macron)

This topic contains 9 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Monk  Monk 2 days, 6 hours ago.

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  • #878318
    +2
    743 roadmaster
    743 roadmaster
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    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/the-latest-macrons-government-may-face-no-confidence-vote/2018/12/06/9d10886e-f94f-11e8-8642-c9718a256cbd_story.html?utm_term=.98adeed41519

    1 p.m.

    French left-wing opposition parties are seeking a no-confidence vote in President Emmanuel Macron’s government amid growing protests and fears of violence.

    The Socialist Party, far-left Defiant France and the Communist Party are setting aside their divisions and promising to submit the request to the lower house of parliament, or National Assembly, on Monday. The assembly would hold a no-confidence motion within 48 hours of the request.

    The left-wing parties alone don’t have nearly enough votes to bring down the government, since Macron’s centrist Republic on the Move party has a strong majority in the 577-seat house. But they are trying to attract support from other opposition forces.

    The move is a new swipe at Macron and his government, dramatically weakened by weeks of “yellow vest” protests.

    The government is trying to calm tensions but with little success. The transport minister met Thursday with truckers’ unions but they maintained their promise to go on strike Sunday.

    ——————-Interesting it is the leftist that smell the blood in the water and are pushing to have the vote. With Macron’s approval in the 20’s he should be done, stick a fork in him.

    mgtow is its own worst enemy- https://www.campusreform.org/

    #878323
    +1
    743 roadmaster
    743 roadmaster
    Participant

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6467921/Macrons-popularity-crashes-lowest-violent-protests-continue-country.html

    Five consequences of France’s ‘yellow vest’ protests

    Anti-government protesters wearing fluorescent yellow jackets have roiled France for nearly three weeks and shaken the government of President Emmanuel Macron. Here are five key consequences of the crisis:

    A weakened president at home

    Since his election in May 2017, Macron, a former investment banker, had styled himself as a resolute and visionary president in the style of famed former French leaders such as Charles de Gaulle.

    His detractors saw in him the authoritarian instincts of a older historical figure: Napoleon Bonaparte, the 19th-century general who named himself emperor of the French.

    Having abandoned planned fuel tax hikes on Wednesday, a week after ruling this out in a televised address to the nation, Macron has seen his authority and image take a severe blow.

    ‘The Bonapartist method which was successful at the beginning to launch his reforms is not suitable any more,’ Philippe Moreau-Chevrolet, an expert in political communication, told AFP this week.

    The protests also come as his government is preparing to push through other contested changes, including a hugely sensitive shake-up of the pension system which is likely to spark fierce resistance.

    With his political opponents emboldened and protesters sensing weakness, will Macron be able to deliver any more of his vision of a France that is more business-friendly and less dependent on state spending?

    Angry France is back

    The sight of burning barricades in the street, mass demonstrations and a government in a retreat is a wearily familiar one for observers of France.

    But for foreign investors and his fans abroad, Macron had provided hope that France might finally put an end to decades of high unemployment and low growth.

    The 40-year-old spent much of his first 18 months in office wooing foreign companies, at one point inviting global CEOs to the Versailles Palace for dinner, where he wheeled out his catchphrase: ‘France is back!’

    Overhauls of labour laws and the state railways, as well as tax cuts for businesses and high-earners, passed with relative ease.

    But it is angry street protests that are back, not the image of a ‘start-up nation’ wedded to innovation and technology that Macron envisioned.

    ‘The attractiveness of France has taken a real hit,’ Economy Minister Bruno Le Maire conceded on Monday.

    Nationalists rejoice

    The election of Macron, a pro-EU centrist, bucked the electoral trends around Europe which have seen gains for rightwing populism – something Macron has likened to ‘leprosy’.

    Since taking office, he has positioned himself within the EU and on the international stage as a leading voice for centrist politics and multilateralism.

    With European Parliament elections looming in May, Macron said voters faced a stark choice between nationalists like Hungary’s hard-right Prime Minister Viktor Orban and Italian far-right leader Matteo Salvini, and his own ‘progressive’ camp.

    His side has taken a hit.

    ‘Macron is not a problem for me, Macron is a problem for the French,’ Salvini quipped this week in an interview with Politico.

    Economic strains

    Macron had named reining in France’s public spending a priority since taking office and had set himself an objective of balancing the country’s books for the first time since the 1970s by the end of his term.

    But cancelling planned fuel tax rises next year will leave a hole in the budget of around two billion euros ($2.3 billion), and Macron might still have to give more ground to appease the angry ‘yellow vests.’

    The government had a target of reducing its deficit to 2.8 percent of GDP this year, just under the 3.0 percent limit set under the EU’s Stability and Growth Pact.

    Any further concessions or a decline in economic growth – due to disruption from the protests, falling investment or fewer visits by tourists – will exacerbate the impact of the crisis.

    A republic under pressure

    The crisis has prompted a new round of soul-searching about France’s fifth republic, established under de Gaulle in 1958, which institutionalised the role of an all-powerful president.

    The new constitution was intended to put an end to the instability and ineffectiveness of the parliamentary system which emerged in France after World War II.

    But the French have soured in record time on three successive leaders – Nicolas Sarkozy, Francois Hollande and now Macron – making many observers question the hyper-centralisation of power in the hands of the president.

    Macron scored just 24 percent of the votes in the first round of the presidential election, pushing him into the final round but leading his most vocal critics to question his legitimacy and his programme ever since.

    ‘The republic is under threat,’ the head of the upper house of parliament, Gerard Larcher, told France Inter radio. ‘I’m not seeking to be dramatic. I want everyone to understand their responsibilities.’

    mgtow is its own worst enemy- https://www.campusreform.org/

    #878324
    +1
    Carnage
    Carnage
    Participant
    19290

    Sniff sniff sniff can you smell it?

    I hope that perverted creep do something stupid, all is needed is a martyr and france could become a blood bath.

    LET THE CARNAGE BEGING.

    To those following me, be careful, I just farted. Men those beans are killers.

    #878327
    +1
    Carnage
    Carnage
    Participant
    19290

    Please please please macron, do something stupid, please, give the french people a martyr, let me see paris burn in flames, let me see the second largest economy in europe drop to its knees and see how this european joke crumbles and die a horrible death.

    All hell may break lose, mean while i shall laugh and enjoy the fire.

    To those following me, be careful, I just farted. Men those beans are killers.

    #878346
    +2
    FrankOne
    FrankOne
    Participant
    1030

    One chart shows where France has been going… The higher the ‘Government Spending to GDP’ ratio, that is, the more economic output the STATE controls relative to the INDIVIDUAL, the bigger the S~~~HOLE the country is.

    France Gov Spending

    haha, I don’t give a rat’s ass if it’s a REPUBLIC. If the Almighty State is determining where 56% of economic output goes, rather than INDIVIDUALS who earn incomes, it isn’t a FREE COUNTRY. You can elect Marine Le Pen or whomever… Look at the chart, it’s going UP.

    And the US’s chart, while still at 37%, is also going UP.

    I actually LIKED Macron’s policies, aside from the gas tax hike. Had pensions been controlled, and labor markets freed, unemployment would be LOWER, and the country more PROSPEROUS. Had the public spending been REDUCED, economic GROWTH would have increased.

    No way in HELL will you see such policies in France, the USA or elsewhere. Once over 50%, it’s game over, in my opinion.

    #878348
    +2
    JB Books
    JB Books
    Participant
    1847

    The root problem with the European Union is the fundamentally bad attitude of its citizens: They all expect free stuff without having to work for it.

    We just don't realize life's most significant events while they're happening. Back then, I thought, "Well, there'll be other days". I didn't realize that that was the only day. - "Moonlight" Graham

    #878385
    +2
    Mr. Spock
    Mr. Spock
    Participant
    9453

    The root problem with the European Union is the fundamentally bad attitude of its citizens: They all expect free stuff without having to work for it.

    We also have that problem here in the US. It seems to be a worldwide epidemic.

    In regards to women, how many teeth must one break before realizing there is no meat on the bone?

    #878410
    Faust For Science
    Faust For Science
    Participant
    19473

    Well, someone in the French government wants to pour fuel to enrage the Yellow Vests/Yellow Jackets: https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-12-07/viral-video-french-students-lined-execution-style-sparks-outrage-protesters-want

    Also, there are rumors that the French government is calling into the French military to deal with the French people.

    I am getting a feeling this might go like the Tiananmen Square Massacre.

    #878483
    Uchibenkei
    uchibenkei
    Participant
    7763

    Why the tax hikes and reformed pension plan? While they say it’s to combat climate change, it’s really to pay for the benefits being given to the migrants. People aren’t going to pay for migrants to come rape and pillage.

    I bathe in the tears of single moms.

    #878493
    Monk
    Monk
    Participant
    10159

    … let me see the second largest economy in europe drop to its knees …

    The French economy is on life support – EU life support – and has been since 1975 (not that France can be said to have ever been truly solvent).

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